Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Breaking Glass In Bakersfield

So sick & so tired of these two-faced bastards & corporate tools. They're coming for the "globalists", Senator, & no amount of hemming & hawing will save you.

Caravan!

Always on top of the news here at WEB OF EVIL (& ENNUI):

Two Words Tuesday

Pork Belly!

Monday, October 22, 2018

Little Slum I (Still) Live In

Imagine my surprise to find a picture of the legally-found-to-be-a-slum in which I live in the Times this a.m. Now imagine my joy when I realize that not only should this force the rent-seeking parasites to fix everything wrong w/ my apt., I may get a few thousand bones from it as well. (I've already called the pro bono law firm in question; several tries have only resulted in a busy signal. Hope that indicates every tenant of the prick mother-fucker landlords is calling, seeking redress.)

(Were this a current photo, you'd see the mini-van w/ a Denver Boot on it in which some low-life is living about where the two-tone model in the pic is. And the piggies think they can profit in this 'hood? Location, location, location, morons.)
Koreatown apartment owner agrees to pay $2.5 million in settlement of tenants' discrimination lawsuit
This is one of the five Koreatown apartment buildings cited in a 2016 lawsuit filed on behalf of 15 tenants who alleged that Latinos and residents with mental disabilities were pressured to move out so the owners could charge higher rents. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)
A real estate investment firm has agreed to pay $2.5 million to settle a federal lawsuit alleging that it pressured Latino and mentally disabled tenants to leave its rent-controlled Koreatown buildings so it could raise the rents.

While denying they had done anything wrong, the Century City investment firm Optimus Properties LLC and several affiliated companies agreed to abide by fair housing laws to make physical repairs to the tenants’ apartments and to ensure that property managers and onsite managers receive fair-housing training.

In a novel form of relief worked out over days of negotiations, they agreed to reserve the next seven vacancies in its buildings for tenants receiving rent subsidies under the federal Section 8 program.

Optimus also agreed to accept late rent payments from three disabled tenants who had received multiple eviction notices for delaying payment up to five days until they received their Social Security checks.

In a joint statement released Friday after U.S. District Court Judge Stephen V. Wilson signed an order dismissing the case, the tenants’ attorneys said the defendants had made “important commitments to ensure fair housing policies and practices are in place for its Koreatown apartment buildings.”

Thomas H. Citron, lead counsel for the defendants, said, “My clients are looking forward to continuing their commitment to fair housing practices, while implementing new policies to provide superior protections for residents.”
Cornelia Martinez, with some neighborhood children. She and her partner, Freddy Velasquez, have lived in their one-bedroom apartment since 1999 with their two daughters. She says she was pressured to leave after the defendants purchased the building, according to a declaration.
Cornelia Martinez, with some neighborhood children. She and her partner, Freddy Velasquez, have lived in their one-bedroom apartment since 1999 with their two daughters. She says she was pressured to leave after the defendants purchased the building, according to a declaration. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)
Terms of the settlement prohibited either party from discussing the case further.

The settlement will provide about $52,000 each to 13 tenants. About $208,000 will go to Strategic Actions for a Just Economy and Step Up on Second, two agencies that advocated for the tenants and provided supportive services to some.

The remainder, about $173,000 in litigation costs and $1,442,000 in attorneys’ fees, will go to four law firms that worked on the case.

The 2016 lawsuit was filed on behalf of 15 tenants in five buildings by the pro bono law firm Public Counsel and the nonprofit law firm Public Advocates Inc.

In addition to Optimus, the lawsuit named five affiliated limited liability companies that are the registered owners of the buildings; Roxbury Ventures LLC, described as Optimus' property management company; and Jerome Mickelson, currently listed on Optimus' website as its executive vice president.

The settlement covers four buildings. In the nearly two years since the case was filed, three of the tenants dropped out, two of the buildings were sold and an additional tenant in a sixth building was added.
Hilda Deras has lived on South Magnolia Avenue since 1977. Like other tenants, she complained of receiving excessive rent hikes and numerous notices to enter her apartment and for eviction. "I don't drive and I have access to the buses, the stores and laundromat,” she says.
Hilda Deras has lived on South Magnolia Avenue since 1977. Like other tenants, she complained of receiving excessive rent hikes and numerous notices to enter her apartment and for eviction. "I don't drive and I have access to the buses, the stores and laundromat,” she says. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)
The lawsuit alleged Optimus violated state and federal anti-discrimination and fair housing laws by pushing out “undesirable” tenants to facilitate rapid resale.

It characterized what the firm’s website referred to as its “Koreatown strategy” as “a complex scheme in the rapidly gentrifying Koreatown neighborhood of Los Angeles, to purchase buildings, displace the existing tenants, renovate vacated units, market the renovated units at much higher rents to young, childless, English-speaking professionals, and ‘flip’ … the buildings at a massive profit.”

At the time Optimus purchased them, it said, the buildings were occupied by significant numbers of Spanish-speaking Latino tenants, families with children, and people with mental disabilities.

In declarations filed with the court, tenants described receiving dozens of notices including requests to enter their apartments, complaints about their children and three-day notices to pay or vacate.

Some of the tenants alleged they received notices of rent increases exceeding the limit in rent-controlled buildings. Others received rent increases without the required prior approval of the Los Angeles Housing and Community Investment Department.

Records compiled for the case showed that tenant Demetrius Allen, who has physical and mental disabilities, received 43 notices in the nearly 18 months between the time a defendant firm’s purchased his building and the lawsuit was filed in November 2016.
Demetrius Allen, a former homeless tenant who has physical and mental disabilities, received 43 notices from a defendant’s firm in an 18-month span.
Demetrius Allen, a former homeless tenant who has physical and mental disabilities, received 43 notices from a defendant’s firm in an 18-month span. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)
They included five utility cutoffs for renovations of other apartments, six pest control treatments, two showings of his apartment, 13 eviction warnings and one notice that his Section 8 subsidy would no longer be accepted.

Allen, 47, who routinely paid his rent on the fifth of the month but never missed, said the flood of notices, which he called his “weekday anxieties,” stopped after the lawsuit was filed.

In the settlement, Optimus agreed to accept his rent checks on the fifth of the month and to allow him to keep a service dog.

Pedro Ramos, who lives with his wife and two children in a studio apartment he has rented since 1997, said in his declaration that his original contract allowed him to pay rent up to the fifth of the month.

Pedro Ramos, who works in the garment industry, has lived in a studio apartment on South Normandie Avenue for more than 20 years, during which his rent has grown from $350 a month to $655.87. He and his wife have raised four children there.
Pedro Ramos, who works in the garment industry, has lived in a studio apartment on South Normandie Avenue for more than 20 years, during which his rent has grown from $350 a month to $655.87. He and his wife have raised four children there. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)
Polonia Hernandez, left, has lived in her South Kenmore Avenue apartment since 1994. Carmen Castro, right, with son Charlie. Since 2011, Castro and her husband have raised a family in the Magnolia Avenue studio apartment, at times also shared by her father.
Records filed with his declaration showed that in August 2016, Optimus’ management company notified him of a 5% increase to $652.25 and a warning that late fees would be charged after the first. Ramos said he asked for repairs to be made before he paid, but the manager never came to inspect his apartment. Instead an eviction case was filed in Superior Court.

After Public Counsel answered the case on Ramos’ behalf, it was dismissed.

Additional support for the case came in declarations and a video made by four tenants who were neither Latino nor disabled and not party to the lawsuit.

They described hearing onsite managers say they had direction from Mickelson to clear out Mexicans and families to make the apartments more attractive to hipsters. All four said their buildings were mostly occupied by Latino families when they first rented them but most tenants are now single people.

Deepika Sharma, the lead attorney for the plaintiffs, said the tenants stuck with it over two years because they wanted to make a difference for other people as well as themselves.

“We didn’t just do this for their own benefit, but to make a point in this city of Los Angeles,” she said.
Michael Prudhomme has lived in his apartment since 2008. He has a federal rent subsidy and receives in-home services from the California Department of Social Services for physical and mental disabilities.
Michael Prudhomme has lived in his apartment since 2008. He has a federal rent subsidy and receives in-home services from the California Department of Social Services for physical and mental disabilities. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)
Let me also note that I am disturbed, not mentally disabled (And if you aren't disturbed by what's going on, you're crazy!) & that the slumlords have pulled the same "late rent" crap w/ me, whose gubmint money arrives the third of the month, even though the City of Los Angeles has a three-day grace period for rent, doubtless from the days when banks were closed weekends & there were no A.T.M.s.

This couldn't have come at a better time for this reporter, as I was feeling quite diminished* by the death of high school classmate Paul Allen a wk. ago. Financially diminished, that is. Paul (his ass't., really) had contacted me through Classmates.com a couple of yrs. ago, but I never replied, partly because I was afraid admitting that I was a loser driven mad by a society of idiots, living in a slum on nut case benefits & a federal housing subsidy would be de facto putting my hand out.

Paul was obviously the most successful member of our class (Bill Gates was two classes behind us.) & I'll go out on a limb & say that I'm pretty obviously the biggest loser therein, w/ the possible exception of our classmate who died in a boating accident the summer between eighth & ninth grades (checking out early may be the ultimate victory) & any others who may have died since w/o my knowledge. Embarrassing for all involved, I figured. And the most I really wanted was free services (All of them!) from Spectrum, of which he was allegedly a large/the largest stockholder. Oh well. More abandonment.

And speaking of outliving losers, I hit the big 65 last mo. (Who'd a thunk it? Speaking of abandonment, thanks for all the well-wishing & congratulations, jerks!) & was advised to expect a two-mo. pension check on or about 1 Nov. because I procrastinated (as w/ P. Allen's ass't.; what if he knew he was illin' again & was looking for people who could use some money & I blew it by waiting?) w/ the paperwork; well, got the mail today & (as I'd been secretly hoping, 'though w/ absolutely no reason to do so) apparently the paperwork went through quickly enough for a month's money to arrive. WOOOOOO!!

I now have enough disposable income to purchase a side-arm/"equalizer", should I decide to administer frontier justice to a certain bunch of parasites in Century City. (After all, they've been found liable in a court of law. ZERO-TOLERANCE, BABY!!) It's Glocktober at Turner's Outdoorsman! Or I could pick up a S&W 9mm for a mere US$379.98, & still afford more ammo than I'll need.

Print & Pixel Compare & Contrast: Above stolen verbatim from Times website. I believe the text is the same (tl;dr) but the print edition has only three photos, in color, those of Cornelia Martinez, Hilda Deras & Michael Prudhomme.

Irksome Quibbles:
  • Why was I never contacted about the lawsuit? (Although the parasite landlords sent a letter begging tenants not to sign onto any legal action should they be solicited.) Perhaps it was assumed from my surname that I wouldn't be an immediate target. Previously in the Times on the subject. I used to see Mr. Rivera at Step Up on Second; he now lives in my bldg., having moved in two yrs. later than I. Missing me & the constant busy signal does make me a bit nervous about using Public Counsel.
  • If the damn mail had come earlier, I could have deposited the checks (Two in one day! The second for US$8.56 from my mother's estate, which does not forgive her in the least for dying & abandoning me. You neither, male parental unit.)
    & started ordering crap on the iNternet immediately. (Did get a six-pack of Under Armour Charged Cotton® 2.0 socks at Marshall's, & ate at Fatburger. Greasier than ever!)
  • Withholding taken from pension check. Will have to file a goddamn fucking tax return next yr.
    I hate everything!!

*180° Wrong Dep't.: The death of any man, woman or child does not diminish us, it betters us: More oxygen,
more space, less competition. It's births that diminish us; each one results in another oxygen-sucking drug on
the oversaturated market of undifferentiated humanoid tissue.

Submarine Stories

FRI 22 OCT 1943
Pacific
Submarine Grayback (SS-208) sinks Japanese transport Awata Maru, China Sea, 26°40'N, 125°00'E.

Submarine Shad (SS-235) attacks Japanese light cruisers Naka and Isuzu, en route from Shanghai to Rabaul, 28°40'N, 124°10'E. Although Shad claims damaging both, neither enemy warship is hit.
Honest mistake, or brazen lie?

Sunday, October 21, 2018

More Tin Can Seamanship*

THU 21 OCT 1943
Pacific
Submarine Steelhead (SS-280) damages Japanese aircraft transport Goshu Maru southeast of Ulithi, Carolines, 08°16'N, 141°53'E.

RAAF Beaufort damages Japanese light cruiser Kiso 53 miles from Cape St. George, 04°23'S, 153°11'E.

Japanese cargo ship No.11 Chofoku Maru is sunk by mine while en route from Surabaya to Penang; cargo ship Rakuto Maru is damaged by mine off Padamarang Island.

Atlantic
Destroyer Murphy (DD-603) is cut in two when she is accidentally rammed by U.S. tanker Bulkoil 265 miles east-southeast of Ambrose Lightship, New York. Murphy's forward section sinks.
Murphy under tow by the USS Glennon (DD-620).
["(T)aking 36 officers and men with it" the Official Chronology does not mention. Other post-ramming photographs at NavSource Destroyer Archive. Scroll down if you click the Wiki link, or go directly to King Ibn Saud's voyage aboard the Murphy. Ripped from today's headlines, sorta.]

Aircraft (VC 13) from escort carrier Core (CVE-13) damage German submarine U-271, north of the Azores.

Mediterranean
German planes attack convoy MKS 28, strafing and torpedoing U.S. freighter Tivives about 15 miles off Cape Tenes; one of 48 merchant seamen and one of the 25-man Armed Guard perish in the ensuing abandonment as the ship sinks swiftly. Free French-manned corvette HMS LaMalouine rescues the survivors, who also include the six-man staff of the convoy commodore and one passenger.

*Refer to 18 & 20 OCT 1943 for previous examples of destroyer hot-dogging.

Two Words For The Taliban

Try Harder!

 Dan Lamothe / Washington Post: 
U.S. general wounded in attack in Afghanistan

Saturday, October 20, 2018

Friendly Fire From Above

WED 20 OCT 1943
Pacific
Submarine Gato (SS-212) sinks Japanese transport Tsunushima Maru between Truk and Kavieng, 01°26'N, 148°36'E.

Submarine Kingfish (SS-234) sinks Japanese merchant cargo ship Sana Maru off Banbon Bay, French Indochina, 12°36'N, 109°30'E.

Atlantic
Aircraft (VC 13) from escort carrier Core (CVE-13), escorting convoy UGS 20, sink German submarine U-378 north of the Azores, 47°40'N, 28°27'W.

Destroyer Cowie (DD-632) is damaged in collision with U.S. steamship Craigsmere in New York Harbor.

Mediterranean
USAAF B-25s and RAF Beaufighters attack German convoys north of Crete, sinking transport Sinfra which, unbeknownst to the attackers, is transporting POWs.